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Education White Paper

By

Allen Polk Hemphill

 

Discussions of education need to be placed in context, and this White Paper will attempt to do so from my personal perspective.

In addition to other professions, I was a Core Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at National University in San Diego. I logged more than 6,000 classroom hours, and many of my courses were required for all undergraduate students – including those students in the School of Education.

Let me just tell you my personal experience: The lowest grades in all of my classes were invariably scored by teachers.

Just to test my conclusion, I enrolled in the School of Education for a second Masters Degree – and quit half way through because of the lack of academic rigor. EVERYONE in every class got an “A,” even if they just mailed in their assignments! (The School Dean told me this was justified because “All parents want their children taught by straight “A” teachers.”)

The University President (Dr. Jerry Lee,) in a discussion of “Grade Creep” with Department Heads, read class after class in the School of Education where everyone received an “A”.

National University provided the highest number of Teaching Credentials in California!

So, with that as a background, I will give you the numbers. Those numbers, taken from government and academic sites, show that California schools are at bottom of the states in academic standing (National Report Card, US Dept. of Education) and that many local schools are not even good California schools.

The best school districts are Torrey Pines, La Jolla, Coronado, and Poway. The Poway Unified School District is the school distinct in which the best education may be had for people who want to buy reasonably priced homes – it is the “Best Bang for the Buck” in education, but not, as often claimed  the “best” school district.

All of this must be placed in the context that U.S. schools are not, in general, very good when compared to European and Asian schools.

So, even being a ‘great” California school is in comparison against a greatly diminished standard – it is like being the Best Dressed Man in Big Foot, Texas!

 

International Comparisons

 

Here are a few quotes from National Center for Education Statistics

(U.S. Department of Education, March 2009)

http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2009/2009039_1.pdf

 

Spending

“Overall, the United States spent a higher percentage of its GDP on education (6.7 percent) than all other G-8 countries.”

Completed Education

“In 2006, the Russian Federation had the largest percentage of adults ages 25 to 64 who had completed higher education (54 percent), followed by Canada (47 percent); Italy had the smallest percentage (13 percent).  In the United States, 39 percent of adults ages 25 to 64 had completed higher education.”

Degrees Granted

“A greater percentage of first university degrees were awarded in the combined field of

social sciences, business, and law than in any other field in all G-8 countries. In science, mathematics, and engineering-related fields, the United States awarded among the lowest percentages of first

university degrees of all the G-8 countries. The United States was the only G-8 country to award more first university degrees in the arts and humanities than in science, mathematics, and engineering.”

Reading Literacy

“…fourth-graders in the Russian Federation outperformed their peers in all other participating

G-8 countries in terms of average scores in reading literacy. U.S. fourth-graders scored higher on average in reading literacy than their peers in Scotland and France, but lower than their

peers in Italy and the Russian Federation. Twelve percent of U.S. fourth-graders reached the advanced international benchmark, the highest of the benchmarks set by PIRLS to describe the range of student performance”

Math

“…students in Japan outperformed students in the other participating G-8 countries in mathematics,6

with higher percentages of Japanese fourth- and eighth-graders reaching each of the four international benchmarks set by TIMSS to describe the range of student performance. For example, the

advanced benchmark (the highest TIMSS benchmark) was reached by 26 percent of Japan’s eighth-graders in mathematics, compared with percentages ranging from 3 percent in Italy to 8 percent in

the Russian Federation and England. In the United States, 6 percent of eighth-graders reached the advanced benchmark.”

Science

“On the TIMSS 2007 fourth-grade science assessment, students in Japan scored higher, on average, than their peers in Scotland, Germany, Italy, and the United States, but not measurably different

from their peers in England and the Russian Federation. At eighth grade, students in Japan had a higher average score in science and generally had larger percentages of students reaching each of the four international benchmarks compared to their G-8 peers”

The United States scored lower, on average, than their peers in the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, and Canada on the combined science literacy scale and on each of the three science literacy subscales: identifying scientific issues, explaining phenomena scientifically, and using scientific evidence. U.S. students outperformed their peers in Italy and the Russian Federation on the identifying scientific issues subscale and in Italy on the using scientific evidence subscale”

 

 

National Comparisons

 

The following State quotes and comparisons are from the National Report Card,

U.S. Department of Education

(Both recent and historical data is included, so you can see any "improvement.")

 

 

 

Reading (2007)

At the Fourth Grade level, California students rank just above Mississippi, Louisiana, and the District of Columbia. (http://nationsreportcard.gov/reading_2007/r0005.asp)

 

At the eighth grade level, California students rank only above Mississippi and the District of Columbia. (http://nationsreportcard.gov/reading_2007/r0005.asp?tab_id=tab2&subtab_id=Tab_1#chart)

 

Writing (2002)

At the Fourth Grade level, California students rank above the District of Columbia, Arizona, Utah, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and South Carolina, Oklahoma and New Mexico.

(http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/statecomp/sortingSingleYear.asp)

 

(2007)

At the Eighth Grade level, California students rank above the District of Columbia, Georgia, Minnesota, Louisiana (by one point), Mississippi, and West Virginia (by 2 points).

(http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/statecomp/sortingSingleYear.asp

 

Math (2007)

At the Fourth Grade level, California students rank above the District of Columbia, Alabama (by one point), Mississippi, New Mexico, and tied with students in Louisiana.

(http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/statecomp/sortingSingleYear.asp)

 

Math (2007)

At the Eighth Grade level, California students rank above the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Mississippi, and Alabama.

(http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/statecomp/sortingSingleYear.asp

 

Science (2005)

At the Fourth Grade level. California students rank above Mississippi. (That’s it, but a few states were not ranked)

(http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/statecomp/sortingSingleYear.asp)

 

Science (2005)

At the Eighth Grade level, California students rank above Mississippi (That’s it, although a few states were not ranked. States with higher scores include Alabama, Louisiana, Tennessee…)

(http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nde/statecomp/sortingSingleYear.asp)

 

California School Analysis

API Results 2008 & 2007

The following are the latest 2008 API scores, and the 2007 scores for each school for comparison. API reports provide information about whether schools meet state requirements under the Public Schools Accountability Act.. The goal is to have every school at an 800 level, but obviously higher scores are better.

 

Note that all schools are links to the main website: http://api.cde.ca.gov/AcntRpt2008/2008GrthAPIDst.aspx?cYear=2005-06&allcds=3768296&cChoice=2004BApiD

 

At this website, you can determine the male scores vs. female scores; the White vs. Latino vs. Black scores; and the scores of those  accepting government aid for lunch programs, and other breakdowns as well, but these raw scores are satisfactory for comparison of schools.

 

 Poway Unified

 

 

 

2008

2007

POWAY UNIFIED

872

864

 

 

 

Elementary Schools 

 

 

 Adobe Bluffs Elementary

917

910   

Canyon View Elementary

925

902   

Chaparral Elementary

922

916   

Creekside Elementary

952

954   

Deer Canyon Elementary

951

944   

Garden Road Elementary

868

861   

Highland Ranch Elementary

903

901   

Los Penasquitos Elementary

917

910   

Midland Elementary

879

872   

Monterey Ridge Elementary

907

892   

Morning Creek Elementary

892

901   

Painted Rock Elementary

903

909   

Park Village Elementary

921

938   

Pomerado Elementary

868

889   

Rolling Hills Elementary

917

905   

Shoal Creek Elementary

912

905   

Stone Ranch Elementary

922

917   

Sundance Elementary

921

904   

Sunset Hills Elementary

858

851   

Tierra Bonita Elementary

880

899  

 Turtleback Elementary

902

910   

Valley Elementary

815

803   

Westwood Elementary

894

890

 

 

 

Middle Schools  

 

 

Bernardo Heights Middle

893

873   

Black Mountain Middle

877

863   

Meadowbrook Middle

851

855   

Mesa Verde Middle

918

897   

Oak Valley Middle

895

904  

 Twin Peaks Middle

884

881

 

 

 

High Schools  

 

 

Mt. Carmel High

827

816   

Poway High

845

833   

Rancho Bernardo High

834

818   

Westview High 843 836

 

 

 

 

 

 ASAM Schools  

 

 

Abraxas Continuation High

660*

546*

 

 

 

 

 Escondido Schools

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ESCONDIDO UNION ELEMENTARY

734

724

 

 

 

 Elementary Schools  

2008

2007

Bernardo Elementary

894

886   

Central Elementary

732

727   

Classical Academy

858

866   

Conway Elementary

709

690   

Farr Avenue Elementary

701

653   

Felicita Elementary

658

654   

Glen View Elementary

697

682   

Heritage K-8 Charter

875

865  

 Juniper Elementary

703

691  

 L. R. Green Elementary

875

878  

 Lincoln Elementary

682

665   

Miller Elementary

773

766   

North Broadway Elementary

805

815   

Oak Hill Elementary

722

732   

Orange Glen Elementary

762

746   

Pioneer Elementary

 

651

Reidy Creek Elementary

852

852   

Rock Springs Elementary

726

715   

Rose Elementary

692

685

 

 

 

Middle Schools  

 

 

Bear Valley Middle

804

797   

Del Dios Middle

689

656   

Hidden Valley Middle

713

701   

Mission Middle

665

639   

Rincon Middle

778

760

 

 

 

ASAM Schools  

 

 

Nicolaysen Community Day

441*

386*  

 

 

 

ESCONDIDO UNION HIGH

716

701

 

 

 

High Schools  

 

 

Classical Academy High

812

844*   

Escondido Charter High

827

815   

Escondido High

730

717   

Orange Glen High

688

677   

San Pasqual High

757

742

 

 

 

ASAM Schools  

 

 

Center City High

643*

590*   

Valley High (Continuation)

467

481*  

Valley Center Schools

 

 

2008

2007

VALLEY CENTER-PAUMA UNIFIED

780

778

 

 

 

Elementary Schools

 

 

  

 

 

Lilac

848

847   

Palomar Mountain Elementary       

 

 

Pauma Elementary

723

731   

Valley Center Elementary Lower

806

807   

Valley Center Elementary Upper

792

805   

Valley Center Primary

842

854

 

 

 

Middle Schools  

 

 

Valley Center Middle

799

796

 

 

 

High Schools  

 

 

Valley Center High

771

752

 

 

 

Small Schools  

 

 

All Tribes American Indian Charter

519*

571*   

 

 

 

Valley Center Independent Study

654*

723*

 

 

 

ASAM Schools  Oak Glen High

532*

538*

 

 

Send mail to allen@allenhemphill.com or dolphinrealty@earthlink.net with questions or comments about this web site.
Copyright © 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 by Allen Hemphill
Last modified: August 13, 2012